Archive for the ‘Rally’ Category

A walk over the new Impreza R4
thanks to OfficialiRally

I’m gonna call this Video Friday! Now these videos have been making their way around the net so I won’t bore you too much with the details. Sit back and enjoy the videos (and choas).

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I love how Travis is still around rocking his Subie even though many have shunned his circle track duties as of late. If you’re a true Travis Pastrana fan, you know that he hasn’t forgotten his Subie roots.

In this video that was just uploaded, Travis calls out Ken Block on his marketing campaign etc. It’s all good though and no one should take this all to seriously. After all, DC does cut Travis a paycheck from time to time. It’s like a friend calling you out during a game of ping pong… or fooseball… or maybe something a little more competitive.

Anyways, enjoy this video, I know I did (The car, not the women…. err, ladies… err… Grandmas?)

So I was browsing the internetz today and found this site: http://www.becauseracecar.org

I thought these were funny (featuring subies):

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I have to say, I am actually disappointed in the game Dirt 3.
On the packaging it states more rally content then ever before in the series, when the first game alone was a 100% rally game. Not to mention it’s heritage predecessor the colin mcrae series.
So far I have done like three rally stages in the career mode, and that’s another thing I’m not a big fan of. Now I know that racing games aren’t known for their career progression, but I really think they should be, because if you aren’t racing you’re looking at menus and choosing where next to race.
It’s so linear. Unlike Dirt 2 where you really only had to do the races you are a fan of, the third instalment gives you a path to follow. Not only that, but the game is based on the archaic point system, so they force you to “race” races you don’t want to but also pretty much forces what car you will drive just to make the points to progress (driving certain cars gives you more points).The reason why I put the word race in quotes is because half the time you are in a gymkhana. I like watching Ken Block’s videos, but it’s not as fun to play, especially when you have to place just to move forward.Though I must add, the soundtrack is exceptional ūüôā
That’s my spiel

Our good friends at Dirty Impreza¬†tipped us off to this great news! The 2011 STi sedan has been approved for FIA Group N Homologation. So, what’s that supposed to mean? That means that ¬†the 2011 STi Sedan chassis is approved for FIA Rally!

FIA Group N is one of the categories of vehicles based on production cars and used in competitions around the world. To enter such competitions, vehicles must be homologated according to FIA regulations. With strict limits on modifications to production models, the Group N is known as a category which best reflects the performance inherent to the base car.

*1: Vehicle type: GVB (6-speed manual transmission model), Homologation number: A/N5738 
*2: Please contact STI’s Group N Business Planning Department for compatibilities to existing parts for the Impreza WRX STI 5-door model.

Can’t wait to see these cars in action!

Source: Dirty Impreza

I love seeing the privateers do what they can to stay competitive and even after the event, they have to clean up. Seattle was a wet, muddy, and dirty and he has to clean up. Here’s Stephan’s snapshot of him cleaning up his Subaru in his driveway.

Dave Mirra had an interesting weekend. Seemingly driving his 2011 Subaru STi like a pissed off teenager and being as aggressive as he could. It was amazing to see how hard he was driving and how he was able to really battle it out with the others. Subaru has released this video of his performance and you can see how close some of these battles really were.

Photo by Kyle Lewis

We saw some epic stuff from Global Rally Cross Round 2 in Seattle. With the rain, new ‘track’, and guys getting aggressive so they can make it to the Xgames finale we saw some intense competition.

Photo by Kyle Lewis

So Check out this video that we found on Youtube with Dave Mirra with his destroyed rear end doing what he can to finish the heat! Enjoy!

Our friend Stephan Verdier keeps impressing us with his driving skills, being the only Privateer to compete in the main event at Global Rally Cross in Irwindale, CA this past weekend. We had a chance to talk with Stephan as we always do after his performances and get more info on his win!

Q: Fresh off his 3rd place podium at the Global Rally Cross main event, we have Stephan Verdier! Thanks for joining us again at Subie-Life.com. So please tell us when you started converting your drifting / rally cross Subaru STi into a full dedicated Rally Cross vehicle and how that process went:

A: Always nice to talk to you Yukio. At the end of FD season I knew that needed a new car to be competitve in that sport, unfortunatly during the winter I wasn’t able to findd any money to build a new car and do the season of FD (at the same time). In the other hand my Subie was a great car to run in Rally Cross. Beginning of February I decided to strip the entire car and do some major modification to lose about 200 lbs. All the work was done at GTI in San Clemente. Crawford Performance supplied the engine, transmission and Motec ECU, Tein suspension, Cooper tires / the rallycross tires, Exedy clutch, Garrett Turbo, Ignite fuel with the E85 and Enkei Wheels. Converting the car back to awd was pretty simple, the car was pretty much stock in FD so I just needed to put the center diff and front diff in the gear box and voila!

Q: How did the build into a full Rally Cross Vehicle differ from the Drift Car Build this time around?

A: The build wasn’t that much different. We cut right in front of the shock tower and built a full tubular frame front end that can be change or remove really easily in case of damage. We took some weight off the A, B, and C pillar, ¬†and I had GP Motorsport build me a full custom wiring harness but otherwise it’s the same car as last year.

Q: A couple of weeks leading up to the Global Rally Cross at Irwindale, how did you prepare yourself and your vehicle to compete? Did you have time to practice?

A: Because I don’t have much of a budget, all the work has to be done for free from my sponsors. They dedicated as much time as they could but they have to take care of there customers too. I had to work a lot during the last month so I couldn’t spend a lot of time on the car. We were way behind on the prepartion and we worked like mad men within the last 10days. We finished the car on Thursday at 2:00 am. I went into the first event with no practice and bunch of untested parts. We put a steering quickner but the pump is too slow. It was like driving without power steering. It was hard for me to get any feed back from the car with such a hard steering. We also added a pedal box but I we put the wrong size master in it, ¬†so I had to push so hard on the brake pedal (to stop)! My right foot is still sore from it (pedals). We didn’t have time to set up the antilag and launch control and the center differential was stuck in open mode. We are fixing all this problems for the next race. It’s nobody’s fault, we just ran out of time to test the car. No big deal.

Q: Tell me how different Global Rally Cross from the Formula Drift events that you competed in for several years.

A: The main difference, there is no judge. You can’t argue with the clock. It makes easier to see how to improve, if your too slow you need to go faster, pretty simple. In drifting you have to adapt to a person (judge’s) view of what is perfect, and you have 3 people to please with different view of what is perfect, it’s kind of tricky!

Q: Let me set the record straight, do you like Rally Cross / Rally or Drifting more as a driver and competitor?

A: Rallycross/ Rally has always been my favorite. I love drifting too, it gave me so many new skills and made me a better driver.

Q: So day 1 of¬†Global Rally Cross, you and the other competitors didn’t get much practice on the actual course so, how did you adjust to be competitive in a completely new course?

A: You’re right we didn’t get much practice but it was the same for everybody. The bank was the hardest to set up your car for and the most important part of the track. We were behind since I had to learn the car before I could make any changes. I wasn’t concern about the race on Friday, I took Friday event as a test day in preparation to Saturday.

Q: How did you feel about your first day of competition?

A: It was prettty good. The car was reliable and fast, but needed a lot of work on handeling. The big part was me too, I only had an average of 4hours sleep/day for the past week. We made a lot of changes to the set up and it worked, the car was 3 seconds faster on Sat.

Q: Day two must have been exciting for you. We saw you get very aggressive and we even saw a few competitors get very close to your doors / bumpers. Tell me how the first few rounds went for you.

A: First I came in with a good night sleep. We got a lot more practice on the track and found some good speed in the set up. The competion was really exicting. Racing next to Marcus (Gronholm), Rhys (Millen) and Tanner (Foust) was a lot of fun. During the regular heat I wanted to be agressive to show the other drivers that I’m not going to be push around but I didn’t want to hurt the car either. In the Main (event) I¬†didn’t care.

Q: During the last main event we saw you follow Tanner Foust and Marcus Gronholm for the first few laps and then you did your joker lap over the jump. Was that your strategy to keep close to those guys or did you see an opportunity that most of the viewers didn’t get to see then took the opportunity? And that is why you jumped when you did?

A: The strategy is always take the joker last if you’re not held up by the car on front of you or if you’re in the lead. Something bad can happen really fast on the big jump, so you want to keep it for last. Marcus (Gronholm) and Tanner (Foust0 were not slowing me down at all, so I choose to stay behind and hoping they would make a mistake.

Q: How did you feel when you realized that you were locked in as a 3rd place winner in the main event when you went around the last dirt turn?

A: It was aweome, coming out of the jump I saw Tanner and knew I could give him a run for his money in the last corner, but I over cooked the braking  and went wide. I was pretty mad about that but then as soon as I crossed the line I realize that I got 3rd and it was fantastic.

Q: Finally, how can our readers find more information about you and would you like to thank anyone that has helped you?

A: There is a couple place they can find info, Facebook, www.stephanverdier.com. I want to thanks all my sponosrs and firends, Crawford Performance, GTI, Cooper tires, Ignite Fuel, TEIN, RMR, Sparco, Exedy, Enkei, Block DCB, GP motorsport.

Thank you Stephan for taking time to talk to us at Subie-Life.com! Good luck on the rest of the season and we hope to see you at more events!